Domuztepe Mound and Excavation Site

Domuztepe Mound and Excavation Site

Domuztepe, meaning Pig Hill in Turkish, is a large archaeological site with about 20 hectares of land. It was occupied as early as 6,200BC and abandoned 5,450BC.

Domuztepe was most likely founded by the Ceramic Neolithic (c. 6400 BC) but evidence of an earlier settlement could exist. At the late Halaf site, Domuztepe may have been occupied by a significant population ( c. 5450 BC). Evidence for prehistoric occupation ceases towards the end of the Halaf period (the prehistoric period which lasted between about 6100 BC and 5100 BC). The site was reoccupied during Hellenistic and Roman times, with evidence for a Christian church at this time and a small 1st millennium AD Christian burial ground found there as well with traces of occupation still visible in more recent centuries as well.

Domuztepe Mound and Excavation Site

To date the bones and artifacts found at the excavation site, a sequence of three major prehistoric stages has been identified. The transition from Ceramic Neolithic to Early Halaf (c.6100 BC) is first, followed by Halaf occupation c.5450 BC until c.5100 BC), all well-represented onsite thanks to the series of trenches where archaeologists have located circul inside buildings in addition to their material culture finds that include ceramics, stone bowls, beads, figurines, chipped stone tools and stamp seals--among other things like animal bones and botanical remains.

The 'T' shaped and stylized human-looking 5-centimeter stone amulet (the object believed to be a talisman), found in the excavations at Domuztepe Mound in Kahramanmaraş, has a 'T' shape with wild animal figures in Göbeklitepe, which is described as the 'zero point of history' with its 12000-year history. resemblance to the standing stones draws attention.