Ephesus Ancient City

Ephesus Ancient City

Ephesus is a historic area of Asia Minor in modern-day Turkey. It was once considered the most important Greek city and trading center in the region. The city survived multiple attacks and changed hands many times between occupiers, but managed to stay alive for centuries because of its strategic importance as an economic hub.

A Neolithic settlement marking a southern edge of the former estuary has now pushed far inland and is abandoned prior to settlement on the Ayasuluk Hill from the Middle Bronze Age. Established in 2000 BCE, the sanctuary of Ephesian Artemis (originally an Anatolian mother goddess) had become one of ancient world's largest and most powerful temples by 1st century AD.

The Ionian cities that grew up in the wake of the migrations joined together under Ephesus to form a confederate government. In 4th century BCE, Lysimachus, one of Alexander's Twelve Generals, founded a new city called Ephesus while leaving the old city around Artemis' temple. When Asia Minor was incorporated into Rome as a province in 133 BCE, Ephesus was designated as its capital.

Ephesus Ancient City

Excavations and conservation have revealed grand monuments of the Roman Imperial period lining the old processional way through Ephesus, including the Library of Celsus and terrace houses.Little remains of an admirable temple called The Temple of Artemis which drew pilgrims from all around the Mediterranean until it was eclipsed with Christian pilgrimage to Mary’s Church in 5th century CE. Pilgrimage to Ephesus has outlived the city itself and continues today. The Mosque of Isa Bey and the medieval settlement on Ayasuluk Hill mark the advent of the Selçuk and Ottoman Turks.

Excavations and conservation have revealed grand monuments of the Roman Imperial period lining the old processional way through Ephesus, including the Library of Celsus and terrace houses.Little remains of an admirable temple called The Temple of Artemis which drew pilgrims from all around the Mediterranean until it was eclipsed with Christian pilgrimage to Mary’s Church in 5th century CE. Pilgrimage to Ephesus has outlived the city itself and continues today. The Mosque of Isa Bey and the medieval settlement on Ayasuluk Hill mark the advent of the Selçuk and Ottoman Turks.

The list of the places that you can visit when you are visiting Ephesus ancient city is as : Magnesian Gate, East Gymnasium, Early Christian Basilica, St Luke’s Grave, Bath Of Varius Ephesus, State Agora, Temple Of Isis, Basilica, Hydrekdocheion, Hellenistic City Wall, Odeon, Temenos, Prytaneion, Domitian Square, Temple Of Domitian, Fountain Of Pollio, Hercules Gate, Memmius Monument, Curetes Street, Fountain Of Trajan, Terrace Houses, Scholastica Baths, Temple Of Hadrian, Latrines, Octagon, Brothel, Hadrian’s Gate, Heroon, Celsus Library, Gate Of Mazeus, Temple Of Serapis, Commercial Agora, Marble Road, Ephesus Theatre, Theatre Gymnasium, Arcadian Street, Harbour Baths, Harbour Gymnasium, The Double Churches, Ephesus Stadium and Vedius Gymnasium. As you can see the abundance of places to visit in Ephesus above, you will need at least 3 hours to visit Ephesus Ancient City.

Ephesus Ancient City has been added to UNESCO World Heritage List in 2015.